Dramatic fall in earnings of self-employed, as their numbers rise

A study by the independent think-tank, Resolution Foundation, has found that the typical self-employed worker earns 40 per cent less than the typical employee, and that weekly earnings for the self-employed have seen a 20 per cent fall since 2007. In contrast, the average employee has seen a six per cent fall in their weekly earnings.

Northern Ireland homeless charity's benefits warning

The charity Crisis has warned that homelessness in Northern Ireland could rise because of the pressures on social housing and benefit changes, and it has urged the Northern Ireland Executive to take action to protect the vulnerable.

A study by the charity for single homeless people and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation found that one in 18 adults had experienced homelessness in Northern Ireland, which equates to six per cent of the adult population. This figure includes those living on the streets and people who have no option but to stay with relatives or friends.

Over 2000 new jobs and apprenticeships from leading STEM organisations

The Chancellor, George Osborne, has announced a new campaign to boost participation in science, technology, engineering and maths (the ‘STEM’ subjects) at school and beyond, with over 170 leading businesses and institutions offering over 2,000 jobs and apprenticeships.

The campaign – called “Your Life”, will have targeted advertising and will include a scheme to boost the number of high-skilled science teachers alongside the pledges from businesses.

Homeless women being failed across the country

The charity, St Mungo’s Broadway has told the Ministerial Working Group on Homelessness that homeless women are being failed at both the local and national levels across the UK.

They were presenting findings from their recent Rebuilding Shattered Lives report, which brought together more than 200 contributions from charities, academics and homeless women themselves, and set out the issues, good practice and ten recommendations.

Inclusion partner with Numbers4Good to support organisations interested in bidding for SIBs intended to help young people

The Centre for Economic and Social Inclusion have partnered with Numbers4Good to support organisations interested in bidding for the £30m Social Impact Bond fund for vulnerable young people. 

The funding will help 14 to 24-year-olds to develop crucial skills to improve their educational achievement and employability, and therefore will prevent them from falling into a situation where they are not in education, employment or training (NEET).

Claimant Commitment now rolled out across the country

The latest figures show that the Claimant Commitment, whereby all new jobseekers and those completing the Work Programme must agree and sign a commitment in order to receive benefits, has been successfully rolled out across the country.

Public procurement can help reduce youth unemployment, according to new JRF report

A new report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation entitled “Tackling poverty through public procurement” has found that Public sector contractors could be creating thousands of jobs for marginalised young people.

The report argues that placing a requirement on contractors to undertake targeted recruitment and training would generate many additional job-with-training opportunities for people entering the labour market: and that it could be done at little extra cost, by linking this to existing apprenticeship, training and job-search provisions.

Single parents of pre-school children face new sanctions threat

The charity Gingerbread has warned that single parents with very young children will be put at risk of inappropriate sanctions as the government rolls out new income support rules to jobcentres from 28 April.

Prison Reform Trust: Prisons sliding towards “punishment without purpose”

A new briefing by the Prison Reform Trust has revealed that, six months on from their introduction, new prison rules are undermining fairness and rehabilitation behind bars.

Welfare reform driving poor out of London, says Chartered Institute of Housing

The coalition government’s welfare reforms, which moved Local Housing Allowance (LHA) rates to a lower level; reduced the rates for single people aged 25 to 34; and imposed a maximum cap on LHA rates which ranges from £250 for a one-bedroom home to £400 for a four-bedroom home per week, are driving poor families in London out of the private rented sector, according to the Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH).

New guide aims to boost disabled apprentice numbers

The national charity, Disability Rights UK, has launched “Into Apprenticeships”, a new guide for disabled people, parents and staff on applying for apprenticeships in England that will be distributed for free to every school in the country.

UCAS refuses to share data which could help councils target skills and employment support

There is a risk that tens of thousands of school-leavers could miss out on vital help to find jobs, training or further education in 2015 because councils are being refused access to crucial information on where to target support.

Office of National Statistics reveals first business estimates of employee contracts without guaranteed hours

A snapshot survey by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) has shown that employers in Great Britain are using around 1.4 million employee contracts that do not guarantee a minimum number of hours.

Non-guaranteed hours contracts (NGHCs) include, but are not exclusively, “zero-hours contracts”, as they also include some other contract types which do not guarantee a minimum number of hours.

Office of National Statistics reveals first business estimates of employee contracts without guaranteed hours

A snapshot survey by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) has shown that employers in Great Britain are using around 1.4 million employee contracts that do not guarantee a minimum number of hours.

Non-guaranteed hours contracts (NGHCs) include, but are not exclusively, “zero-hours contracts”, as they also include some other contract types which do not guarantee a minimum number of hours.

Help to Work Scheme launched

The Chancellor, George Osborne, announced the Help to Work Scheme, a plan to help the long term unemployed, in September 2013. It took effect on 28 April 2014, and it will affect anyone who has been on the government’s existing Work Programme, but who still has not found a job after two years.